How do three-judge panels work for deciding cases in the Court of Appeals?

Published 03/17/2015 08:05 AM   |    Updated 12/06/2016 10:31 PM
How do three-judge panels work for deciding cases in the Court of Appeals?

The Court of Appeals hears cases in three-judge panels to ensure a fair review of the decision of a single trial court judge and to prevent the chances of an evenly-divided panel. The Court does not hear cases "en banc," meaning as a full court of 15, but judges do rotate panels regularly using a mathematical formula so that all 15 work with one another over a 2-1/2 year period.

Cases are randomly assigned.

More information can be found at http://courts.in.gov/appeals/2347.htm.
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